European Premiere

Woman Before A Glass

BY LANIE ROBERTSON.
DIRECTED BY AUSTIN PENDLETON.
19 January -
3 February 2018

Overview

“I’m always fascinated by men in baggy trousers… The mystery of it all. Who really needs them and who simply thinks he does.”

Peggy Guggenheim collected art, and artists. Married to Max Ernst, lover of Samuel Beckett, champion of Jackson Pollock and Pablo Picasso, Peggy's love life was as colourful as her art collection. She moved to Venice in the late 1940s and quickly became one of its most glamorous, scandalous residents.

Lanie Robertson's play brings Peggy's remarkable story to life. Peggy's passionate loyalties and prejudices changed the face of twentieth century art - but at what cost?

Lanie Robertson writes about iconic artists and the societal issues they faced in Nasty Little Secrets, Alfred Stieglitz Loves O'Keeffe, and Woman Before a Glass. His plays have been produced internationally at venues as prestigious as the Kennedy Center, the Old Globe, and Festival d'Avignon. Robertson is a member of the Dramatists Guild, Writers Guild, East; and the Societe des Auteurs et Compositeurs Dramatiques.

Austin Pendleton is a Tony-nominated and Obie Award-winning director, actor and playwright. His productions have been seen on Broadway and in London at the National Theatre. Pendleton served as the Artistic Director of Circle Repertory Company and is a member of Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago. He teaches acting and directing in Greenwich Village.


People

Judy Rosenblatt
Peggy Guggenheim
A student of Uta Hagen's, Judy has performed as Peggy Guggenheim for audiences in the US and UK since 2007.

Lanie Robertson
Playwright
Austin Pendleton
Director
Tom McClane
Assistant director
Erika Rodriguez
Set design
Catherine Siracusa
Costume design
Ali Hunter
Lighting design
Rachael Murray
Sound design


Media

“Beautifully delivered as a one woman tour de force by a brilliant Judy Rosenblatt.”
The Spy in the Stalls
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“Rosenblatt doesn't just play Peggy - she inhabits her.”
London Theatre 1

 
“Worth collecting.”
The Independent